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Announcing our new Global Data Tool!

Hello!

Earlier this year, in collaboration with our partners at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication and the Meliore Foundation, we released the broadest study ever done on climate messaging, asking 60,000 people across 20 countries – what motivates you to take action on climate change?

Today, we’re launching a global tool that allows you to dive deep into the data, zooming in on the countries and questions you’re most curious about. In the new tool, you can discover how people in each country responded to questions about their priorities for climate action, the impact of different climate narratives, and their values and principles when it comes to tradeoffs.

Snapshot from our Global Data Tool. Explore today.

In the new tool, you can discover how people in each country responded to questions about their priorities for climate action, the impact of different climate narratives, and their values and principles when it comes to tradeoffs.

 That’s Interesting 

Here are 5 interesting facts we observed as we built out this tool:

  1. Of all countries, Germany had the highest percentage of the population ranking climate change as their top voting priority, at 15.5%.

     

  2. The US, Norway, and Australia lead the pack in terms of the proportion of people who didn’t think we needed to reduce our use of fossil fuels.

     

  3. In South Korea and Japan, the older generations are 10% to 20% more likely to say it’s “this generation’s responsibility to act,” compared to the younger generation. These are some of the widest spreads when it comes to generational gaps compared to other countries.

     

  4. The country that appears the “most comfortable” in talking about climate change is India. The country that seems the “least comfortable” in talking about it is South Korea. (Although, Germany – despite frequently ranking it as a high priority – comes in a close second.)

     

  5. Longtime Potential Energy followers will remember our first newsletter asked, “Are men useless?” The question stemmed from a consistent (and wide) gender divide on “support for climate change action.” Indeed, the gender divide appears to be true globally, as well. On the whole, compared to men, women were far more likely to increase their support for climate action after viewing a message.

As you explore the tool, please let us know: What were your most interesting takeaways?

We hope this serves as a useful resource. As always, please share any feedback you may have – we’d love to hear about how it’s being used, the kind of impact this data might have in your work, or how it sparks new research!

Happy exploring,
John and Jessica

 

John Marshall John Marshall is the founder and CEO of Potential Energy. John advises global leaders on strategies to effectively communicate about climate solutions, and is a frequent industry commentator and speaker. John’s innovative approach to building public support for climate action is informed by his 30+ years of experience advising the leaders of Fortune 500 companies on branding and marketing.
Jessica Lu Jessica Lu is Associate Director of Strategy and Analytics and leads Potential Energy’s Insights Lab. She leads teams that execute hundreds of message tests and focus groups and perform in-market measurement analytics to unearth what motivates humans to care about climate change. Jessica graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering.